1 Apt. 2B Baking Co.: Marmalade Pull Apart Bread

Friday, May 4, 2012

Marmalade Pull Apart Bread

Marmalade Pull Apart Bread

I've talked about my "condiment situation" here before so I know many of you also find yourself with an overabundance of jam on your shelves. Well, with rhubarb season in full swing and strawberries just around the corner I decided it was time to face the pantry head on, and by pantry I mean the shelf in my closet where I keep my jam. It's next to the extra sheets if you were wondering. Fancy, I know. This little loaf that I whipped up last weekend is a lot of things, fun to eat, easy to share, your toast and marmalade all in one, but the best part is that it uses an entire 8oz jar of marmalade. Like a lot of sweet bread this is the tastiest the day it’s made, but if you have to keep it around for a day or so make sure you wrap it up tight and warm it up before you eat it.

Marmalade Pull Apart Bread

For the Dough
adapted from Smitten Kitchen
yield, one 9x5 loaf

3 cups all purpose flour
2 Tablespoon sugar
1 envelope active dry yeast (2 1/4t)
1/2 teaspoon salt
4 Tablespoon unsalted butter
1/3 cup milk + 1/4 cup milk, separated
2 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla

For the Filling

8oz marmalade
4 Tablespoon butter, melted
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
½ vanilla bean scraped  or 1t vanilla extract (I used a vanilla scented marmalade and I loved the vanilla flavor so much, but this is totally optional)

To Assemble

1. In a small saucepan heat the 1/3c milk and butter until the butter is melted. Add in the 1/4c milk, vanilla, and the sugar. Let the mixture cool to between 105-115º, then whisk in the yeast and set aside until the mixture is foamy and frothy. 2. In a large bowl stir 2c flour and the salt together, then add in the yeast mixture and stir until the liquid is incorporated. Add the eggs in one at a time, followed by the last cup of flour. Stir for about two minutes, the dough should be quite sticky, but well mixed.
3. Place the dough in a large, greased bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Let it rise until doubled in size, about an hour. While the dough rises, prepare the filling.
4. Dump the marmalade into your blender (or use an immersion blender) and pulse a few times to break up the bits of zest, I pulverized mine pretty well because I wanted it to be easily spreadable. If your marmalade has finer bits of zest to begin with, you probably won’t have to go crazy with the blender, you don’t want to totally puree it. Then, add in the spices and vanilla if using. If you are using a flavored marmalade, you might want to skip the spices and vanilla, your call. Grease and line a 9x5 loaf pan with parchment.
5. After the dough has risen, dump it onto a floured board and roll it into a roughly 12x20 rectangle. Use a brush or spoon spread the melted butter onto the dough, then gently spread the marmalade mixture on top. You want a very, very thin layer of marmalade so you may need a bit less than 8oz total.
6. Slice the dough into 6 vertical strips, then stack the strips on top of each other. Slice the stack into 6 squarish pieces. Lay the stacks of dough in the prepared loaf pan so the layers are visible, like the pages of a book. Cover and let rise until almost doubled again, 30-45 minutes.
7. Heat your oven to 350º. When the dough has risen, put the loaf pan onto a sheet pan and slide it into the oven. Bake until deep golden brown, 30-35min. Let it rest for about 20 minutes then dig in!

16 comments:

  1. i am also a "jammer"...meaning i make more jam than one person could possibly eat (or gift), so much so that it gets jammed onto shelves next to, well, maybe not linens, but wherever it fits. It is beautiful really, all of those multicolored jars, but the edible part gets lost on me. This recipe promises to help. Lovely photos

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  2. I don't know what it is but I too have an addiction to jams and preserves. I'm thinking that there are more of us out there than we might have thought. I have jars tucked everywhere - the shelf above my washer and dryer, my food pantry, and more than a half dozen open jars in my refrigerator. I pick them up at farmer's markets, specialty stores, and even in the aisles of TJMaxx and Home Goods. I am always looking for delicious ways to use them up other than on my morning toast. I will add this recipe to my list.

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  3. Beautiful! I'll definitely have to attempt this, I have jars stacked three high in the back of my cupboard.

    p.s. It was so great seeing you the other night! I was lucky enough to be gifted some of your leftover caramel corn and made a point of eating it for lunch the next day. Lunch! Yes, like, instead of a sandwich. It. Was. AWESOME.

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  4. This is a surprising recipe, so usefull for the jam overstocking and for my personal jam proyect...thank you!

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  5. I made this last night as my first attempt at making leavened bread (I usually stick to cake-y stuff like banana or pumpkin, because yeast terrified me.) It was a huge, delicious success, and I'll be enjoying the leftovers for a couple days. Thanks for the fabulous recipe; I'll be making this anytime I have orange marmalade lying around!

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    1. Oh this makes me so happy! Yeast bread can be intimidating at first, but once you get over your fear the possibilities are endless.

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  6. I don't know. It looks wonderful, but we never have too much jam around here. Can I substitute mustard?

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    1. Hi Laura - Check out the original recipe from Smitten Kitchen, she made a version with cheddar, mustard and beer http://smittenkitchen.com/2012/02/cheddar-beer-and-mustard-pull-apart-bread/. Sounds pretty good to me!

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  7. Trying this weekend - sounds heavenly :)

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  8. Great idea! It is sad to see jars of jam languishing in the pantry. I'm picturing a slice of this bread heated and maybe a little chocolate spread involved. Yum.

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  9. oh sweet! i had a group of friends in la who i'd gather with every year and make jam once strawberry season hit and i'd come home with a good three or four jars of jam every time that i had no idea what to do with; a girl can only eat so much jam. now i have the perfect recipe for when i start jam sessions in ny! quite literal jam sessions. :)

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  10. T for teaspoons for tablespoons?

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    1. A small "t" indicates teaspoon a large "T" indicates tablespoon

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  11. Perfect! I have the same problem (and learned the hard way you can get a lot of marmalade out seemingly not a lot of fruit). I've made this bread and a friend of mine just made it for brunch, both times with the cinnamon. Looking forward to trying out this variation (and using up some jam!)

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  12. I love your blog!! Just found you and I have really enjoyed looking thru the past recipes! I would think this would work with any jam?

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