Saturday, July 7, 2012

Raspberry Currant Jam

raspberry currant jam

A trip upstate a few weekends ago to help some friends build a clay oven (more about this exciting development later!) quickly turned into a raspberry picking spree after we saw a sign on the side of the road advertising U-Pick berries. I don't think I've even seen raspberries sold in anything larger then a half pint since I moved to the East Coast so as soon as we pulled over I grabbed a basket and booked it out to the fields with my pals. 

raspberry currant jam

We walked up and down the raspberry rows and picked and picked until our arms were scratched from the brambles and our fingers stained from the fruit. It was a glorious summer day and I couldn't help but smile to myself and dream up all of the ways I was going to use the pounds and pounds of raspberries I was picking. Growing up, a corner of my parent's garden was always dedicated to the raspberry bushes that my dad grew from sad little twigs and the smell of raspberry jam boiling away on the stove (a few times per summer) is a smell I haven't experienced in years. When I got home, I knew that a batch of jam was my first order of business.

raspberry currant jam - 2

My mom always made a simple jam with raspberries, sugar and pectin. She never bothered to strain the seeds out so I don't either, but I have adapted the recipe so it no longer requires pectin. I also threw about a pint of tart red currants to add a bit of zing to the jam but by all means, if you can't find currants where you live, you can certainly just use raspberries. If you'd like to make your batch of jam a bit more refined feel free to strain the seeds and be warned that you'll end up with a smaller yield, maybe six half pints instead of seven. 

raspberry currant jam - 3

Raspberry Currant Jam
yield, roughly 7 half pints jam

8 ounces red currants (or raspberries if you can't find currants)
40 ounces raspberries
32 ounces sugar
juice of 2 lemons

1. Add the raspberries, currants, sugar, and lemon juice to a large, wide, non-reactive pot.
2. Bring the mixture to a boil over medium high heat, stirring occasionally. As the jam comes to a boil, skim the foam that rises to the top of the pot and discard.
3. Raise the heat to high and boil for 10-20 minutes or until set, being careful not to let the bottom scorch. Begin checking for doneness at 10 minutes. I generally use the wrinkle test to check for doneness with this type of jam, but if you like numbers you can cook it to 220ºF. If you prefer seedless jam, quickly transfer the cooked mixture to a mesh strainer and force as much as the jam through as possible, discard the seeds and proceed with canning.
4. Pour the jam into sterilized jars, then process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes.

raspberry jam-syrup-14

21 comments:

  1. That last photograph is so cool.

    Tempting jam. I just finished a batch of strawberry jam, my third this season, to give away to friends. I wish I had the recipe for this one sooner.

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  2. How fun! I wish there were raspberry U-picks here. However, I went strawberry picking today! I really love U-picks, and driving home with the car totally bursting with sweet berry smell.

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    1. We walked through the last of the strawberries on our way to the raspberry bushes and they were so deliciously fragrant. I'm sure your car smelled incredible!

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  3. Currants are a fabulous addition to jam - I made a strawberry and black currant jam a few weeks ago and it is glorious. Now, though, I am seriously coveting your combo...

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  4. Looks like so much fun!! These are breathtakingly beautiful.

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  5. I love the idea of combining raspberries and currants. Currants are flooding the Zürich markets right now and I've been wondering what to do with them, this jam is a great solution. I think I might cut down on the quantities a bit, only because I'm so tempted by every other jam recipe out there and there is no way I'd be able to consume all the jam I plan on making. Beautiful post!

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    1. Currants are an awesome addition to just about any berry jam. I hope you photograph some of those currants in Zurich. I always love your shots!

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  6. so, so amazing. i'm downright green with envy of anyone who has the means (or car) to get away for the weekend now that summer's in full swing; when i first moved here i had dreams of going upstate, to new jersey to anywhere the fruit resides to pick...i guess i'll have to just wait a little longer until i am with car again.

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    1. Thanks Kay. I feel really lucky to have friends with a car and I try my best to tag along with them upstate whenever I can. Otherwise, I would be stranded in this great city of ours.

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  7. These are so beautiful. I've been really enjoying your blog and your photos, and I think it's amazing that you use film.
    If you don't mind me asking, which photo lab do you use for film processing and scanning? I have been trying to find a good photo lab in New York, but still haven't found one that I like. If you have any recommendations I'd love to hear them. Thanks!

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    1. Thank you so much. I love my film cameras, even though processing can be a little spendy. I actually use a few different labs depending on what I need, but most often I just use a cheap Ritz Camera shop on 88th and Broadway.

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  8. Hey Yossy! Such lovely red berry pics. Currants are so magical, right? I haven't had any raspberries yet this summer, but that will definitely be remedied soon.

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  9. Oooo.... how I love raspberries. I also love the addition of currants to this jam! Will bookmark this until summer returns to Sydney and give it a try.

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  10. The berry jam looks so good. So are the photographs!

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  11. An honor to be featured on Punk Domestics with you today.

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  12. Nice combination - I envy you, no red or other currants are allowed to grow in Maine, and you never see them in the supermarket.

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