Thursday, October 4, 2012

One For the Road

seattle-5 blackberry jam seattle-8-2 Untitled seattle-7

Well, it's been drizzly all week and I roasted my first pumpkin of the year so I think it's safe to say that fall is here. I'm just the tiniest bit sad to see summer go, but I am far more excited to see what this season of change has in store. So, here's the last of my summery photos and one last (ok two) recipe(s) for the road. Yes, I know, it's probably too late to make blackberry jam this year, but maybe bookmark these recipes for next summer? I'll be back soon with something a bit more autumnal.

Classic Blackberry Jam
yield about 6, half pints
This jam is simple and unadorned, just blackberries, sugar and lemon and it tastes like a Northwest summer. I will cherish every bite of every jar.

3 1/2 pounds fresh blackberries, rinsed
1 3/4 pounds sugar
3 ounces lemon juice

1. Add the blackberries, sugar, and lemon juice to a large, wide, non-reactive pot. Use a potato masher to gently mash the fruit.
2. Bring the mixture to a boil over medium high heat, stirring occasionally. As the jam comes to a boil, skim the foam that rises to the top of the pot and discard.
3. Raise the heat to high and boil for 10-20 minutes or until set, being careful not to let the bottom scorch. Begin checking for doneness at 10 minutes. I generally use the wrinkle test to check for doneness with this type of jam. If you prefer seedless jam, quickly transfer the cooked mixture to a mesh strainer and force as much as the jam through as possible, discard the seeds and proceed with canning.
4. Pour the jam into sterilized jars, then process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes.

Blackberry Fig Jam with Lime
yield 6-8 half pints
Green figs can be very sweet and tart blackberries temper their flavor nicely in this jam.

2 1/2 pounds fresh blackberries, rinsed
1 1/2 pounds green figs, stem ends removed and chopped coarsely
1 1/2 pounds sugar
4 ounces lime juice
1t lime zest

1. Add the blackberries, chopped figs, sugar, and lime juice to a large, wide, non-reactive pot. Use a potato masher to gently mash the fruit.
2. Bring the mixture to a boil over medium high heat, stirring occasionally. As the jam comes to a boil, skim the foam that rises to the top of the pot and discard.
3. Raise the heat to high and boil for 15-25 minutes or until set, being careful not to let the bottom scorch. Begin checking for doneness at 15 minutes. I generally use the wrinkle test to check for doneness with this type of jam.
4. Stir in the lime zest, pour the jam into sterilized jars, then process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes.

marionberries seattle-6
seattle

17 comments:

  1. Blackberry jam is my favorite, and I truly savored the berries during my trip to Seattle this summer (they don't grow here in Colorado). Would you believe we had snow flurries this morning? Fall is here! Crazy.

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    1. Snow already!? I wish I could send you a big bushel of blackberries, they are delicious.

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  2. I'm a bit sad to see summer go myself. And now I'm wishing that I'd stopped to pick some roadside blackberries on my recent trip out to northern CA–that blackberry fig jam has my name all over it.

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    1. The lime juice was totally inspired by your love of limes! So it really does have your name all over it!

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    1. Thanks N, I had a feeling you might :)

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  4. beautiful pictures. I just roasted my first pumpkin of the year last week. It's so interesting how my body naturally craves different things when the season changes.

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    1. Thank you, Pearl. I agree, I have been craving all of my favorite cold weather comfort foods lately.

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  5. One of my favorite things in the whole wide world is to go to Farmer's Markets. These shots are beyond gorgeous. It's hard to believe at the end of this month that most farmer's markets will be closing until next summer.

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    1. Thanks Jade. We're lucky enough to have a few year round markets, although the pickings get pretty slim in the winter months.

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  6. can we pretty please take a trip to the market in coming weeks? maybe even somewhere new, a bit north, a bit west or a bit east. i haven't even made my first autumn pie yet, and it hasn't quite struck me yet until i have the aroma of a butter crust and fruit bubbling away in the oven.

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