Monday, April 15, 2013

Homemade Croissants

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One of my favorite things about our new apartment is that we have space for an honest to goodness dining table. I mean, sitting on the floor and eating off of the coffee table worked great for years and our friends were always nice about it, but I have to assume that they prefer our current setup, even if it consists of an old school desk surrounded by an eclectic collection of stools and desk chairs. Baby steps, people.

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Now, all of that is to say, we've been having people over to eat more often. Usually on Sundays and usually for a lengthy and loung-y brunch, a meal I find infinitely more enjoyable at home (rather than a restaurant) where I don't have to wait 45 minutes for a table or for my coffee to be refilled. Where the eggs are always cooked just how I like them and the home fries are crispy, but perhaps most importantly, when you have brunch at home, you can excuse yourself to lay down on the couch mid meal if you feel the need and you can encourage your guests to do the same.

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Constructing a solid brunch menu is a delicate process. There must be coffee and juice and water and a little hair of the dog if you're up for it. I'm usually not (afternoon drinks ruin me for the rest of the day), but I fully support those who are. Alongside all of those beverages there should be something sweet and something savory. Something carb-y and something fresh. And if you're at my house it pretty much goes without saying that there must be something baked and maybe a little fancy like these babies.

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These croissants take a bit of time and planning to pull off. You could make them in a day and a half if you are feeling ambitious or you can put them together a little at a time over the course of a few days, which is the route I chose to take. I made this batch over the course of a week, which is why the light varies so wildly in these photos, and it worked great. All I had to do the day I wanted to serve them was roll them out, cut them, and let them rise before baking which took a few hours of mostly hands-off time. I'm noticeably a little short on finished croissant photos here, and I'm sorry about that, but I'm sure you can all figure out why.

Homemade Croissants
adapted from Tartine
yield 16-18 croissants 

Tartine lists ingredients in cups, grams and ounces. I used the gram measurements which I have included below along with the ounce measurements. If you'd like the cup measurements check out The Fauxmartha, but I have to say if you like baking enough to attempt croissants at home you should own a scale. There is quite a bit of resting/waiting/rising time in this recipe so make sure to read through the entire recipe at least once before you get started. Also, I've added a few notes throughout the recipe, they are in italics. 

For the Preferment

6 ounces/150ml nonfat milk (I used whole milk because that's what I had on hand)
15ml/1 tablespoon active dry yeast
6 1/4 ounces/175g unbleached all-purpose flour

For the Dough

20 ml/1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon active dry yeast
14 ounces/425ml whole milk (room temperature)
28 ounces/800g unbleached all-purpose flour
2 1/2 ounces/70g sugar
20ml/1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon salt
15ml/1 tablespoon unsalted butter, melted

Roll-in Butter

22 ounces/625g unsalted butter, cool but pliable

Egg Wash

2 large eggs
2 ounces/60ml heavy cream or milk
pinch salt

To make the Preferment

1. Heat the milk in a small saucepan until it is just warmed through, about 80-90 degrees. Pour the milk into a medium bowl and stir in the yeast until dissolved. Add the flour and stir the mixture with a wooden spoon until a smooth, but sticky dough forms. Cover the bowl with cheesecloth or plastic wrap and let the mixture rise until it has almost doubled in volume. This will take 2-3 hours at room temperature or overnight in the refrigerator. Truth be told, I left mine in the fridge for two days with no problems at all. I think the extra day gave the finished croissants more flavor.

To make the Dough

1. Add the preferment mixture to the bowl of a stand mixer. Add the yeast and mix together on low speed with the dough hook until evenly combined. You may have to stop the mixer and scrape the dough off of the hook occasionally. When the mixture has come together, increase the speed to medium and mix for a couple of minutes.
2. With the mixer running, slowly add in half of the milk and mix until well combined. Reduce speed to low and add the remaining milk, flour, sugar, salt and melted butter. Mix until the dough comes together, about 3 minutes. Turn off the mixer and let the dough rest for 15-20 minutes, loosely covered.
3. Turn the mixer back on low speed and mix the dough until it is smooth and elastic, no more than 4 minutes. If the dough seems very firm, add in more milk, 1 tablespoon at a time. I added a tablespoon or two. Make sure to not overmix the dough as over-mixed dough will result in tough, glutenous croissants that are difficult to roll out. Cover the bowl with cheesecloth or plastic wrap and let it rise until the volume increases by half, about 1 1/2 hours.
4. Lightly flour a work surface and transfer the dough to the surface. Gently press the dough into a rectangle 2'' thick. Wrap the rectangle in plastic wrap and place it in the refrigerator to chill for 4-6 hours.

To "Laminate" the Dough with Butter

1. About 1 hour before you are ready to start rolling and laminating the dough, take the roll-in butter and place it in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Mix the butter on medium low speed until it is malleable but not warm or soft. Turn the soft butter onto a piece of plastic wrap and  wrap it up. Place it in the refrigerator to stay cool, but don't let it harden completely.
2. Lightly dust a work surface with flour and place the rectangle of chilled dough on it. Roll the dough into a rectangle 28 inches by 12 inches.
3. With the long side of the rectangle facing you, and starting from the left side, use your fingers to gently and evenly spread the butter over 2/3 of the rectangle, leaving the far right side butter-less. Fold the un-buttered third of the dough over the butter, then fold the left-hand third over the center, like a letter. Gently pinch all of the seams of the dough to hold the butter in place.
4. Give the rectangle a quarter turn so that the end seams are to your right and left and the long edge of the dough is facing you. Again, roll the dough into a 28 inch by 12 inch rectangle, being careful to not break the seams holding the butter in. Fold the rectangle into thirds and transfer to a lightly floured quarter sheet pan. Wrap tightly in plastic wrap and let the dough rest in the refrigerator for 1 1/2-2 hours before making the final turn.
5. Lightly flour a work surface and place the refrigerated dough on top. Again, roll the dough to a 28 inch by 12 inch rectangle and fold it into thirds. Place the rectangle back on the quarter sheet pan and wrap tightly with plastic. Place the pan in the freezer for at least one hour. If you plan to make the croissants the next morning, transfer the dough from the freezer to the fridge the night before. Alternately, you can freeze the dough for up to one week, just remember to transfer the dough to the fridge the night before you plan to bake the croissants. I froze my dough for 5 days before baking.

To Finish the Croissants

1. Transfer the thawed dough to a lightly floured work surface and roll it into a rectangle 32 inches by 12 inches and about 3/8 inch tall.
2. Use a ruler to mark 4 inch intervals at the bottom of the dough. Cut the dough into long triangles, 4 inches wide at their base. If you'd like to make pain au chocolat, cut the dough into 6 inch by 4 inch rectangles. I made a combination of the two. 
3. To shape the croissants, begin with the base of the triangle facing you, gently stretch the base and roll the base towards the point. To finish, grab the point, stretch it gently, and tuck it underneath the rolled dough. This will help the croissants stand tall and proud. To shape the pain au chocolat, place a baton of chocolate or a few ounces of chopped chocolate in the center of the rectangle and, starting from a long end, carefully roll the croissant. Place the croissants or pain au chocolat, seam side down on a lined baking sheet at least 2 inches apart. I used two baking sheets.
4. Loosely cover the formed pastries and let them rise until at least doubled in size, 2-3 hours, in a draft free area. The ideal ambient temperature is 75º, but a bit warmer or cooler is alright as long as the temperature is not so warm that it melts the butter in between the layers. When the croissants are finished rising the pastries should be puffy, but still a bit firm to the touch.
5. When the croissants are ready to be baked, preheat your oven to 425º and prepare the egg wash by whisking all of the ingredients together. About 10 minutes before you are ready to put the croissants in the oven, gently brush them with the egg wash then let the wash dry slightly before baking. Make sure to wipe up any errant drips of egg wash on the baking sheet.
6. Place the croissants in the oven and turn down the temperature to 400º. After 10 minutes, quickly open the oven door and turn the sheet pan(s) 180º which will help the croissants bake evenly. Bake for 6-10 more minutes or until the croissants are deep golden brown.
7. Remove the croissants from the oven and place on a wire rack to cool. They are best enjoyed fresh and warm, but they can be stored in an airtight container at room temperature for 1 day or for up to 3 days in the fridge. Genltly warm them in a 375º oven before serving.

Bonus Recipe

If you have any scraps of dough left over after cutting your triangles and rectangles DO NOT throw them away. Roll them in a mixture of 4 tablespoons sugar and 1 teaspoon of cinnamon. Then curl them up into little snails and tuck them into a muffin tin. Let them rise until they are doubled in size and bake in a 400º oven until crisp and deep golden brown. My little cinnamon snails are pictured above with the grapefruit juice and they were such tasty little treats.

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The aftermath.

19 comments:

  1. Those look and sound absolutely unreal!! Beautiful stuff.

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  2. If you ever get a chance to eat the ones at Tartine, you must! I treat myself to those a few times a month and they're wonderful. So is all the rest of the things there. A lovely place.
    Can't do the baking myself, I'm too impatient and live too close to Tartine.

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  3. So impressed, they turned out swimmingly!

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  4. I think this has inspired me to make croissants this weekend for my friends. Beautiful!

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  5. Your croissants look absolutely perfect! I've made them a couple of times now and absolutely love the look and flavour but it is very time consuming... Will have to roll up my sleeves and get involved again soon :-)

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  6. I loveee what you did with the extra dough. They turned out just as beautiful, if not more.

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  7. Yossy, These are such a lovely way to celebrate your new-ish and improved space! I am hopelessly by the seat of my pants in the baking department, but your gorgeous baked goods are certainly an inspiring reason to try and up my game. I'm moving soon, and really looking forward to giving this ambitious recipe a try in my new kitchen!

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  8. I made this recipe a while back and had a problem with butter leaking out of my croissants while baking, which resulted in the bottoms basically frying in hot butter. I spent a lot of time researching the problem, but the only thing I've come up with is that I stretched my dough layers too much in the lamination process creating uneven layers that let the butter leak out. I tried freezing the dough after proofing but before baking which reduced the problem somewhat but not fully. Any tips?

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  9. I love the bonus recipe, and I could recognize your croissants by the shape--such a distinctive Tartine shape!

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  10. I want to be your friend and be invited to these amazing brunches...

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  11. The foods are really healthy and easy to make. I’m gonna try cooking this at home. This makes me excited! Thank you so much.

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  12. You have an absolutely beautiful blog, so inspiring! So glad to have stumbled across it :) Your croissants look wonderful!

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  13. yes! balance is so important in any meal true, but i think it's really in the simplicity of a leisurely sunday brunch where balance really has a chance to shine. filling but not laden, rich but not heavy, light yet fulfilling. it's a bit of a pipe dream so i'm not celebrating yet, but there's a soft search for a studio space in progress so i'm dreaming of the day we can finally move out my studio desk have a real table with real chairs for guests to sit and lounge about in. ah, seating - the stuff of dreams!

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  14. Your croissants look amazing! So perfect!
    I love the combo great food + couch. Always a winner. ;)

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  15. Amazing croissants! I can't wait to attempt on my own someday. So nice to read about how you guys are settling into your new home :)

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  16. Nothing better than home made croissants! I used a recipe from the best French bakery in Maine, and it is interesting to see the differences (only a few), but the results are both great.
    Good idea to make those little cinnamon pin wheels, I kind of squeezed the cut off half triangles together to make an not so pretty "outlet" version of the regular croissants.

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  17. Very well made croissants, one can tell you are an experienced baker, i had my share of trouble with the Tartine recipe. I urge your to take on the next book from Tartine, the bread book from Chad. It features a completely different croissant recipe than their first book. It requires maintaining a wild yeast starter (which is a new wonderful and messy world of dough making) but worth the trouble. Both recipes are excellent.

    I have seen a comment from Rachel above about butter leaking. Over the years i learned that there are several things you must consider when making croissants, in order of importance:

    1. Final rising time is crucial, for warm climates, 2.5 hours at least. in colder climates, closer to 4 hours.
    Make sure you not exceed 27 degrees celsius, any hotter and the butter starts to melt.
    You want your croissants at least double in size, and very puffy (if you move the pan, they jiggle).
    putting them in the oven too early will cause the butter to pool on the bottom of the pan, as there is not yet enough dough volume to absorb the butter while it is melting.
    (wake up at 5am on a sunday? ...)

    2. Let the dough rest sufficiently in the fridge between turns, but not too long that the butter will harden (1.5-2 hours)

    3. when cutting and shaping the croissants, work quickly. keep in mind your fingers are warming up the dough and butter.
    I suggest after rolling the dough, cut it in half, and put one half in the fridge, while you shape and cut the other half.
    when you are done, take it out, and you have more time to work before it melts.

    Good luck!

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